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Farmers need to make sure they have the right crop rotations to help lower the risk of diseases like fusarium, sclerotinia and aphanomyces root rot.

Brent Flaten, Integrated Pest Management Specialist with the Ministry of Agriculture, says being too tight with crops like durum, canola and pulses that are susceptible to those diseases can be an issue, but proper crop sequencing can

help reduce the risk.

"We've had some experiences during these wetter years where if you have both peas and lentils in a crop rotation your not too tight in the same crop, but both of those crops peas and lentils are suspectable to aphanomyces root rot," Flaten said.

"If you have airborne spores blowing in from diseased stubble next to the crop that your seeding in 2017, you can still get disease, but it tends to be a lot less if you're having a tight rotation and have that diseased stubble that you're actually seeding a susceptible crop that your seeding in 2017."

Flaten adds there are other benefits beyond disease management with crop rotations, including increased soil nutrients when following a pulse crop with a cereal.

 

 

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